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UN NATURE TRAIL

As part of a days Outdoor Learning Festival in a primary school an activity used was an ‘Un-nature Trail’. Along a hedge, but have done it along a pathway before, I had placed items that were all ‘man made’ or all un natural. Some were at eye height, some were high, some were at ground level all designed to make the participant use their observation skills. However, because we as humans have so much information being received at any one time we filter out the vast majority. This means that if we don’t focus then things get missed! What colour top was that person wearing that you just passed? If it wasn’t really bright or stood out in some way you filtered it out. No need to put it at the front of your mind. So small everyday items can be filtered out on this activity. 
It can be run in different ways and you will think of differentiation all the time. A list of the items can be given and you have to find them. You can tell the class how many there are and they have to list them – they may well find others if you’ve done a walk of the trail before. 

You can develop this into sorting the materials after the trail and this can be planned into items that are selected before the trail starts. 

Rules say that no pointing. Try not to give away the fact that you have seen the item. Do not remove it. 

Here is a list I have used before. Some create discussion. 

Paper clip 

Coat hanger

Wooden clothes peg

Shoe lace

Pencil

Fluffy hedgehog

Ruler

Tent peg 

Cup

Sweet wrapper

Battery

Paper bag 

Fabric

Have one idea for using an app for collecting your score which can be used for any collection of data. Could be counting leaves, a wildlife study, ecological survey, tadpole count, but in this case the criteria is materials. The app,used is ‘ Dartfish Easy Tag. 

You can use existing templates or create your own, change the criteria to fit your survey or score. You can then look at the data and use how you wish. I took a photo at each stage to record and then put into Pic Collage for this this post. Once the data has been saved it can be emailed to an account or you could share the results over a Seesaw class account with the rest of your class and teacher.

Tipi Ceremony – Values

craigarmiger - OutdoorCoaching

In the beginning, the idea of the Tipi was the USP (unique selling point) of my new business Outdoor Coaching UK. It is has now developed into a very versatile piece of equipment which enables the introduction of a variety of Outdoor Learning and life skills.

The first outing was to Maesglas Primary School in Newport to use Outdoor Learning as a vehicle to help engage pupils that had poor attendance (70%average) back into school. It was also to look at the values of who and where they were in relation with family and school.


I had been speaking via Facebook to a friend (funny how this new world of social media creates friends who you have never met, but have a relationship with) who teaches in Northern Canada and has become immersed through marriage and occupation as a headteacher into the Cree First Nation people. Bruce was able to…

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Outdoor Mental Health 

‘Just going outside for a breathe of fresh air’, ‘ go outside and play, it will do you good instead of being inside all day!’.

A few phrases that I had heard from an early age and now have a more profound ring to them. As our screenagers get engrossed into their own virtual world,  they are cleverly marketed into the supposition that they are engaged socially into a green and healthy world because the online game is set Outdoors. 

A single hour outside during the day would aid their whole life health plan. A few litres of air blown in by the wind instead of recirculated teenage bedroom aroma, a stride across the garden or woodland track instead of an excited leg twitch of another kill on the screen could put years on their healthy calendar.

What’s the alternative? Statistics that are quite shocking today that apply to our young people. High security prisoners now get more daily outdoor time than our average young person. Wales has the highest obesity rates in young people than anywhere in Europe, you can’t blame that one on European legislation! 

What is available is Free! Wales has a double Free prescription but only tablets are the drug of choice from our doctors surgery. It should be that our Health Service is linked  to our amazing Welsh Outdoor environment. A walk in a green area, a city park counts, will bring down your blood pressure, reduce stress levels and aid recovery from health problems. 


So, when feeling down, recovering from illness or surgery get Outdoors, scientifically it is proven that the Great Outdoors is indeed ‘Great’ at making you feel better. But then we already knew this, as when we came back indoors from being Outside we were always told to ‘calm down’ as we had too much energy! How do you feel after that walk?  – ‘recharged’. Just listen to the language of the Outdoors in relation to Health in general it says it all! 

More young people can recognise a Dalek and not an oak tree. Time to change our learning and approach to helping ourselves with our health plan and improve our life NOW , rather than in the future saying ‘I wish I’d have got out more!’. 

Have a bit of ‘eco therapy’ in your daily dose of medicines and tonics. 

Operation Natural Well-being. 

The day of operation ‘Nature’s well-being’ had finally arrived. I had been walking through my outdoor journey for the last few months now as my hip replacement  operation had been cancelled several times. I had been on the walk in daylight, dawn, dusk, night-time, sun, wind and rain. Frosty underfoot and very soggy lately. Taking in all the detail of the path, it’s ups and downs the angle of where the trees cross above. The colours, the textures the feelings of the moss and leaf-litter. All this was my master plan in readiness for my thoughts going into the anaesthetic to use Nature to become calm and for a feeling of well-being and a positivity in my mental health. Also using it with the  recuperation afterwards when I am home and for a short while unable to walk the route. 
There is a spiritual side to my thoughts in walking in Nature but there is now scientific medical evidence that green space and fresh air aids recovery. Even the view from your bed window can have an affect on the time of recovery and most importantly the frame of your mind. This was one the incentives in my natural master plan. 

With all this in mind and with the thoughts initially that the wards all face the wonderful vista of the Blorenge and green mountains I entered  the ward on the morning of admission. However, as all plans there may need for some iteration along the journey. Certainly this was the case when they lead me to a side ward of my own with a magnificent view to aid health and well- being.

The ward opposite my room had a magnificent green view. 

My room had a different twist to the meaning of  ‘green’ ! Which meant my plan to become a success had to be a truely walk completely in the mind. 

Another iteration came when a few problems with introducing the anaesthetic meant I did not even open the gate to the woods to start my walk for the journey into the operation.

 Oh well, not to worry. Post operative positivity was in full force, which I am sure came from the influence of the saturation into Nature therapy for months prior to my NHS therapy. 


Within days I was home and using my green journey as part of my recuperation plan. Daily in my exercise routine I finished with a meditative walk along my route through the woods. 

Within a two weeks I ventured onto the walk alongside the stream but not into the wood as my crutches sank too much into the mud. 

Once I had the ability to access fully to the green gym – which is free by the way! the recovery sped up daily. My incentive to walk further in my normal journey motivated my efforts. 

 By week seven I had been to the top of Pen Y Fan much to the surprise of my physio. 


My time in preparation in using Nature to aid my recovery from my hip operation has been in my mind  been essential. The use of Nature and its natural medicine has in my case been a complete success. I can only compare with two years previous when I had my first hip replacement and recovery was so slow in comparison without Natures remedies. 

I am a firm believer in the use of Nature to help with all aspects of health. Taking off the top of the bottle with the label ‘Nature’ is the best move you can make if you have a medicinal need. It’s a tonic that should be taken daily. 

Natures Plug-In

An amazing quick visit to Stackpole Quay last night. The evening was perfect, the tide was in the full moon rising from the horizon. I had the place to myself and the sounds of sea a perfect opportunity to do some reflection. The power of Nature to recharge your soul and spirit never fails to amaze me. These moments are like a natural plug-in for your mental health and well-being. 


We may not realise it at the time as the tonic is taken in so many different methods. The vista is an eye lotion that writes its own label describing to us the awe and wonder of the moment. The sounds of the swell of the in coming tide against the shoreline, ear drops that soothe the inner soul. The taste of the salty sea breeze is a freshness for vitality in adding to that inhalation of breathe. Your toes in the sand, your palms on the cold exposed rocky shore connecting you directly to nature and grandmother earth. 


So just in ‘that moment’ you are plugged into a power unit that is unmeasurable but charges in way like no other. It’s price per unit – priceless. 

Day 1 Wild.    #walkintherain

craigarmiger - OutdoorCoaching

As I drove along with the windscreen wipers heavily in motion a strange ritual was being conducted on the pavement by two non- jacket wearing teenagers. A partially blonde teenager was being helped by her boyfriend to stay out of the torrential Welsh sunshine. In order to prevent the vital locks from becoming drenched and therefore unveiling her camouflage he had placed both his hands above her head. This unconventional butterfly shaped fascinator was certainly keeping me smiling as I headed to my destination. As I passed the end of school day gates, the road became clogged with traffic and waiting parents. Surely not all these children lived that far from school? They lived on a large estate only minutes from home why was there a need to protect their precious cargo from getting wet? We live in a Wales we should be used to the dampness of the environment…

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Tipi Ceremony – Values

In the beginning, the idea of the Tipi was the USP (unique selling point) of my new business Outdoor Coaching UK. It is has now developed into a very versatile piece of equipment which enables the introduction of a variety of Outdoor Learning and life skills.

The first outing was to Maesglas Primary School in Newport to use Outdoor Learning as a vehicle to help engage pupils that had poor attendance (70%average) back into school. It was also to look at the values of who and where they were in relation with family and school. 

 
I had been speaking via Facebook to a friend (funny how this new world of social media creates friends who you have never met,  but have a relationship with)  who teaches in Northern Canada and has become immersed through marriage and occupation as a headteacher into the Cree First Nation people. Bruce was able to point me in the right direction to obtain more information regarding the Cree Tipi ceremony.
  The more I read about the philosophy and the ceremony the more I became immersed in it too.  These values and the way in which the Tipi was constructed resonated personally and formed the basis for the project with Maesglas.

Values are so important, as I had learnt as part of completing an International Diploma in NLP which I had undertaken a few years earlier. They under pin your very being and if upheld, then, like the Tipi create a framework and enable you to tie in all the other parts of your life on. 

The project was structured and aimed to try and have the biggest footfall possible. This meant that 3  two hour sessions per day were used so that year 4, 5 & 6 classes could be targeted during the day. Maesglas Primary is an inner city school with 33 different languages and an old dated building to accommodate this world wide population. However, the school has a fantastic feeling as soon as you go through the door, created by the welcoming staff. The head and deputy are well aware of the benefits of Outdoor Learning, hence the birth of the project. The school year 5 also attend an outdoor residential each year, but is only if they can afford to do it and unfortunately numbers are falling each year.The senior management grasped the opportunity for this unique learning to come to the school and then working together we created a programme outline and a plan was hatched for the start of the winter term. 

The first session involved an activity to understand the pole values and how they fitted into the Cree society, this was also done in the practical way of erecting the Tipi. This turned out to be a fantastic STEM activity.

  
The pupils were interested in how it all fitted together and there was an exploration and interpretation of what today’s values meant to them personally and in relation to their family and school life.

The building of the tipi is used as a great visual to see and feel how values are tied into their life. It required a great deal of teamwork and fun building the frame moving 25 foot poles into place and wrapping the canvas around the Tipi. 

Photographs placed on Facebook always resulted in feedback from Canada, Bruce giving his usual constructive criticism, which ‘was’ really helpful. 

  The second week as the children arrived at school the Tipi was already standing in the school grounds which was’cool’and it was cool at 7 am in the winter darkness, but it also created an amazing atmosphere. 

This second session each pupil had invited someone from home to visit and join their experience. The session began with them explaining to their adults using a metre tall model of the Tipi of how they had proudly built the structure and then what the pole values were. In a quick activity they shared with their elders their values and discussed the differences, as they had to choose one and place it on a ribbon for the top of each pole. 

Two things that caused much discussion was that in any First Nation language there was no word for ‘teenager’, they went from Youth to Adulthood. Also there was no need to have a pole value of ‘trust’ because if all the other values were in place and supporting each other – it worked! Today’s society worked a lot around trust and mentions it all the time, the adults and the pupils worked together on a few trust activities and bonding games.

  
At the end of the activity each adult was given a small piece of ribbon to tie to something significant like a key ring or pen. This was intended to anchor them back to the session and the values they had experienced. The challenge was to keep a value which was most important to them highlighted for 30 days.

It was fantastic to feel the learning and the engagement with their adults in the activities around the Tipi. ” That’s the fist time I’ve trusted you”   ” This so simple an idea and no effort needed to play, only ten minutes of time”. Some of the more meaningful comments heard.

  
The final session in the third week each participant invited another special person from within the school. Some invited siblings, relatives, classmates and best friends.

More values work, team activities and this week a fire pit and marshmallows as a treat. The using of a flint and steel was greeted with much joy when igniting cotton wool. 

A follow up programme over the next 3 weeks repeated the activities and learning, although differentiated, with year 3 who also had poor attendance and this was also a huge success.

The end of the project will come in the New Year with some follow up work sent into the classes, from which some data will be obtained to use to evaluate and substantiate the PDG money to prove that it has been well spent. Although, per head it has only come to £2 more than the price of  a Big Mac meal and the programme has engaged over 300 pupils and over 60 adults from home. 

It’s a shame that you can’t submit smiling faces and the sound of joyful engagement to tick that educational box. All we can do is hope that the creativity and effort put in by all the school staff to engage these  groups using the Tipi project will pay dividends in the long term.